Effects of Sleep Deprivation

How are you feeling today? If you’re anything like me and my friends the answer might well be ‘tired’. In modern society it can seem as though everyone is trying to cram as much as possible into their day, with work, family commitments, studying, exercising and fitting in a social life. This coupled with increased smart phone use (hands up if you scroll through Instagram before you go to sleep..), especially in the evenings can lead to people just not getting as much sleep as they should be.

Sleep deprivation is defined as having less that 7-8 hours of sleep a night for adults (Colten, & Altevogt, 2006). However, a recent survey in the UK found that 70% of adults say they sleep for less than 7 hours each night and over 25% said they regularly slept badly (Sleepcouncil.org.uk).

In today’s society it appears to be normal to be sleep deprived. What effect is this having on our mental health?


Perhaps unsurprisingly, sleep deprivation has been shown to impair our ability to focus. Studies which have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on driving and found participant’s ability to stay in lane was as impaired as a group who were over the legal alcohol limit (Fairclough & Graham, 1999).

Another study looked at the effects of sleep deprivation in students and found that those who had gone without a night of sleep performed significantly worse at a cognitive task than those who had 8 hours sleep the night before (Pilcher & Walters, 1997). Interestingly, the sleep deprived participants in this study rated their performance on the task as higher than those who weren’t sleep deprived! This suggests that when we’ve not slept enough we might not always realise the effect it can have on our performance the next day.

As well as affecting your ability to focus, sleep deprivation has the largest effect on mood (Pilcher & Huffcott, 1996). One study asked participants to go without two nights of sleep, and compared scores on a personality trait questionnaire at baseline and again after they had been awake for 56 hours. When they were sleep deprived, participants showed higher scores of anxiety, depression and paranoia (Khan-Greene et al 2007). Another study has shown than just losing one night’s sleep can increase anxiety scores (Sagaspe et al, 2006). These research suggests that going without sleep can affect the parts of your brain involved in mood regulation such as parts of the prefrontal cortex.

For tips on how to improve your sleep – the full report by the Sleep Council has some useful tips (and more surprising stats) here: https://www.sleepcouncil.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/The-Great-British-Bedtime-Report.pdf



Colten, HR.; Altevogt, BM. Sleep disorders and sleep deprivation: An unmet public health problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press: Institute of Medicine; 2006.

Fairclough, S.H. and Graham, R., 1999. Impairment of driving performance caused by sleep deprivation or alcohol: a comparative study. Human Factors41(1), pp.118-128.

Kahn-Greene, E.T., Killgore, D.B., Kamimori, G.H., Balkin, T.J. and Killgore, W.D., 2007. The effects of sleep deprivation on symptoms of psychopathology in healthy adults. Sleep medicine8(3), pp.215-221.

Pilcher, J.J. and Huffcutt, A.I., 1996. Effects of sleep deprivation on performance: a meta-analysis. Sleep19(4), pp.318-326.

Pilcher, J.J. and Walters, A.S., 1997. How sleep deprivation affects psychological variables related to college students’ cognitive performance. Journal of American College Health46(3), pp.121-126.

Sagaspe, P., Sanchez-Ortuno, M., Charles, A., Taillard, J., Valtat, C., Bioulac, B. and Philip, P., 2006. Effects of sleep deprivation on Color-Word, Emotional, and Specific Stroop interference and on self-reported anxiety. Brain and cognition60(1), pp.76-87.



Dialectical Behavioural Therapy

Talking therapies such as cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) are well-known treatments for some mental illnesses including anxiety and phobias. Today’s post is about a type of CBT which isn’t as well known: dialectical behaviour therapy, or DBT.

CBT focuses on changing unhelpful thoughts and behaviours which cause the continuity of illness – for example changing the obsessive thoughts in OCD through talking and challenging beliefs in therapy (for more about CBT, read my post here). DBT also does this, but with an additional focus on accepting who you are as a person at the same time. ‘Dialectical’ just means to resolve differences and find a balance in patterns of behaviour. It has been developed to treat individuals who experience intense emotions, and is one of the recommended treatments for symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder such as self harm, impulsivity, and unstable relationships (Mind, 2014).

The figure below from the Psychiatric Times shows the 4 sets of primary skills taught as part of DBT: mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance and interpersonal effectiveness. This training is usually in groups, in addition to 1 to 1 therapy sessions.



DBT has been shown to be more effective at reducing symptoms associated with borderline personality disorder than standard group therapy (Soler et al, 2009). In this experiment, participants were randomly assigned to either receive standard group therapy or DBT over 13 weekly sessions. The group who received DBT had greater improvement in depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, irritability and anger than the group who received standard therapy. It also showed almost twice as high retention rate of participants throughout the programme, suggesting it is an acceptable intervention for the treatment of borderline personality disorder.

Another study which compared DBT to usual treatment for women with borderline personality disorder found that participants in the DBT group showed lower levels of self harm than those who received standard treatment (Verheul et al, 2003). The authors hypothesised that this result could be due to specific features of DBT such as monitoring of self-injury with early sessions focusing on modifying these behaviours, patients being encouraged to phone their therapist before carrying them out, and more support for the therapists themselves resulting in less burnout (and so improved patient outcomes).

Overall, this evidence shows the effectiveness of DBT in treating symptoms of borderline personality disorder. More recently, research has moved to test whether DBT is an effective treatment for other conditions such as traumatic brain injury, substance abuse, depression, eating disorders and conduct disorders. However, one recent review concluded that more evidence needs to be collected to establish whether it is the best treatment for other types of mental illness (Valentine et al, 2014).

Thanks for reading this overview of DBT, if you’d like to find out more then Mind have some great online resources – see the link below.



Mind (2014) https://www.mind.org.uk/media/1594506/ms_dbt_2014.pdf

Soler, J., Pascual, J.C., Tiana, T., Cebrià, A., Barrachina, J., Campins, M.J., Gich, I., Alvarez, E. and Pérez, V., 2009. Dialectical behaviour therapy skills training compared to standard group therapy in borderline personality disorder: a 3-month randomised controlled clinical trial. Behaviour research and therapy47(5), pp.353-358.

Valentine, S.E., Bankoff, S.M., Poulin, R.M., Reidler, E.B. and Pantalone, D.W., 2015. The use of dialectical behavior therapy skills training as stand‐alone treatment: A systematic review of the treatment outcome literature. Journal of clinical psychology71(1), pp.1-20.

Verheul, R., Van Den Bosch, L.M., Koeter, M.W., De Ridder, M.A., Stijnen, T. and Van Den Brink, W., 2003. Dialectical behaviour therapy for women with borderline personality disorder. The British Journal of Psychiatry182(2), pp.135-140.

Resilience – innate or acquired?

Hi everyone, and Happy New Year! I’m back after having a few weeks off blogging, and plan to stick to my schedule of 1 post a week in 2018 (usually posted on Thursdays, 4pm GMT).

To start off this year, I thought I’d talk about a concept in psychology which is being applied more to mental health – resilience. Whilst the idea of something being resilient probably isn’t new to you, you may not be aware of how people can be resilient, and what the benefits are of this personality trait.

In psychology, resilience means that someone is able to cope and adapt to difficult life events or stressful situations such as serious health problems or losing their job. It is therefore able to protect against negative outcomes of the stressful event and enable individuals to ‘bounce back’ quicker.

The protective factor model of resilience states that a protective factor such as social support, or self-esteem, interacts with the stressor to reduce negative outcomes such as anxiety or depression (O’Leary et al, 1998). People who have higher levels of social support are more likely to cope with stressful situations, with one study showing that social support moderated the effect of stress on depression scores (Pengilly & Dowd, 2000). Another well-studied protective factor is hardiness, which was identified by Kobasa in 1979. He compared personality traits in executives, and compared who did or did not get ill after stressful life events. He found that those who did not get ill showed more hardiness, which he defined as having a ‘commitment to self’ – an active participation in activities and the outside world; an ‘internal locus of control’ – the idea that you are in control of events that happen to you; and a sense of meaningfulness.

image from https://help4hd.org/on-being-resilient/

As resilience has been shown to have several protective factors on stressful life events, there has been some debate about whether resilience can be taught to improve how people cope, and therefore improve their mental health. One study carried out in college students compared scores on stress levels between a control group and a group who received a resilience intervention (Steinhardt & Dolbier, 2008). The intervention focused on teaching problem solving, coping strategies and awareness of the different responses to stress. Participants in this group were also encouraged to take responsibility and self-leadership (actions coming from the self). Results showed that the group that took part in resilience training had higher resilience scores and scores of protective factors such as self-esteem. They also showed more effective coping strategies and lower scores on tests assessing depression and stress than the control group who did not receive the intervention. This effect was found with only 4 2-hour teaching sessions, showing that resilience can be taught in a relatively short space of time.

Several other studies have shown that resilience can be taught, something which is now gaining in popularity and can be applied to several populations from students to soldiers. Healthcare professionals are also taught resilience techniques as a way of coping with long term stress in emergency situations (McAllister & McKinnon, 2009).

There are some things you can try if you want to improve your resilience. Taking a break, using your support network, and looking after your physical health are all things which could improve how you cope with pressure or stressful situations. For more information on these tips and more, check out Mind.org’s advice here.



O’Leary, V.E., 1998. Strength in the face of adversity: Individual and social thriving. Journal of Social issues54(2), pp.425-446.

Pengilly, J.W. and Dowd, E.T., 2000. Hardiness and social support as moderators of stress. Journal of clinical psychology56(6), pp.813-820.

Kobasa, S.C., 1979. Stressful life events, personality, and health: an inquiry into hardiness. Journal of personality and social psychology37(1), p.1.

Steinhardt, M. and Dolbier, C., 2008. Evaluation of a resilience intervention to enhance coping strategies and protective factors and decrease symptomatology. Journal of American college health56(4), pp.445-453.

McAllister, M. and McKinnon, J., 2009. The importance of teaching and learning resilience in the health disciplines: a critical review of the literature. Nurse education today29(4), pp.371-379.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

It’s that time of year – the clocks have gone back, it’s cold, and already getting dark on our commute home. Whilst many people moan about this time of year, for some it can trigger symptoms of low mood and depression.

Seasonal Affective Disorder is defined as “a type of depression that comes and goes in a seasonal pattern.” (NHS Choices). It’s typically worse from December to February, getting better in spring and summer. For SAD to be diagnosed, there has to be clear evidence of worsening symptoms during winter, which can’t be explained by other circumstances (DSM-IV). In addition, there needs to be evidence for part or full remission during the summer months. Symptoms of SAD are similar to those of depression: low motivation and self-esteem, sleep problems, changes in appetite, withdrawing from social interactions and persistent negative thoughts.


Estimates of the prevalence of SAD range from 0 – 9.4% of the population, depending on who is being studied (Magnusson, 2000). One study compared rates of SAD at 4 different latitudes in the USA and found that is was most common in the northern latitudes (Rosen et al, 1990), which would be expected as SAD can be triggered by lower levels of natural light. This study also found higher rates of SAD in females than males (this finding is in line with overall levels of depression between men and women). It is thought to be caused by the lack of sunlight in winter months disrupting our circadian rhythm, which can be described as our internal body clock. This can affect the serotonin system in the brain, which is responsible in part for mood regulation.

There are various different treatment options for SAD, including light therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, or antidepressants (Lurie et al, 2006). I’ve spoken about CBT before on this blog (see here for more information), so today I’ll just focus on light therapy and antidepressants as treatments for SAD.


Light therapy involves sitting by a specialised lamp, which emits a specified wavelength and brightness of light (at least 2500 lux). It is thought to work by encouraging the brain to produce serotonin – a neurotransmitter which is linked to feeling happy. Sitting by a lamp for 30 minutes to an hour each morning is the recommended ‘dose’ of light (NHS.uk). One meta-analysis has shown that light therapy is as effective as drug therapy in treating SAD (Golden et al, 2005).

Some antidepressants also work by increasing our serotonin levels. Known as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), they work by stopping as much serotonin from being reabsorbed at synapses in the brain and therefore leading to an increase in our mood. For antidepressants to be optimally effective in SAD, the NHS recommend starting to take them before winter and continue until spring.


A week of Mindfulness

I’m sure by now you’ll have heard of mindfulness. It seems to have exploded in popularity in recent years, and is recommended as everything from a cure for severe depression to improved concentration.

Mindfulness can be described as being aware of the present, in particular how we feel on the inside. It generally involves bringing focus back to the body and how it feels at that time. Focus is directed towards the present moment, as opposed to worrying about past or future events. Eyes are typically closed, and attention is directed towards the breathing as opposed to any outside stimuli. Rather than try and block out our thoughts, mindfulness aims to help us acknowledge our thoughts and feelings, but lets them pass without paying them too much attention, which can lead to stress or anxiety.




For someone with an interest in all things psychology and mental health, I’m almost ashamed to say I’ve never properly tried mindfulness myself, with the exception of a couple of group sessions at conferences. I definitely find it easier when I take part in a led session rather than try and do it myself, so I downloaded the Headspace app and decided to give it a go. Here’s how I got on:


1st session: It’s been a few months since I’d had last had a guided session at work – I did try to practice a couple of times recently but found it hard to keep my focus. I started off using the Basics package in Headspace, which starts with an introduction to mindfulness and a few tips to get started. I began with a short 3 minute session, and afterwards I felt noticeably more relaxed, I’m definitely looking forward to the next one. The 3 minutes went by really quickly, I found it quite easy to concentrate on my breathing. No massive change but only day 1!

2nd session: Another short 3 minute session. I found it harder to stop myself focusing on thoughts that popped into my head during the session today. I started it as soon as I’d finished studying and found thoughts kept popping into my head – I know this is okay and you’re meant to acknowledge them and move on but that’s quite difficult in reality! I think I’ll try it at a different time tomorrow and see if that makes it easier.

3rd session: I completely ran out of time so ended up practicing just before I went to bed. I switched to the 5 minute session today, and the focus of this session was on letting thoughts pass. This is definitely the bit that I find most difficult, but it was easier than yesterday. I found the session very relaxing, it really put me in the mood for sleep!

4th session: Again ended up practicing just before bed, and I almost feel asleep! Today I found that I was better at paying attending to my breathing (counting helped) and it meant that I couldn’t really focus on other thoughts which popped into my head. The 5 minutes went so quickly too.

5th session: Getting into more of a routine and practicing at the end of the day. Not much change on this session, but I am definitely enjoying it and look forward to practicing.

6th session: Today I really wasn’t feeling in the mood for practicing mindfulness, I’d had a really busy day and it just felt like another thing I had to do. I did feel so much better afterwards and was glad I did, a bit like going for a run! I found my mind didn’t wander too much but things I need to do tomorrow kept popping into my head, which I found hard to ignore.

7th session: The last one in my week’s trial! It feels like the time during the session seems to go quicker every day, and I always feel much calmer by the end of it. This session started with a short animation using the analogy of the calm mind as a blue sky, and thoughts as clouds which pass across it, which I quite liked. I know the app recommends practicing first thing in the morning but for me I think I’ll probably do it more in the evenings. I’ve got a bit more time, and I think it’s a nice thing for me to do at the end of the day – I’m someone who can find it hard to switch off at night so practicing before bed could help me relax.


By the end of the week I can’t say I’ve noticed any significant changes but I have looked forward to the sessions. I do have to admit – there were a couple of days in between where I didn’t end up practicing, usually if I was out in the evening and got back too late to want to practice. On reflection. these busy days were probably the ones where I should have made sure to take the time out for it – it’s only a few minutes and makes me feel more relaxed afterwards. By the end of the week I felt like I was better at concentrating on my breathing instead of letting my mind wander, although I still slipped up from time to time. In particular, I kept finding myself thinking about things I could say in this post, so now it’s written maybe I’ll find it easier to focus!


I’d definitely recommend giving mindfulness a go, especially if you haven’t already, just to see whether you notice any changes after each session. Have you tried mindfulness before? Let me know in the comments!

World Mental Health Day 2017

Today, Tuesday 10th October is World Mental Health Day – a day aimed to raise awareness of current mental health issues affecting society. The theme this year is mental health in the workplace.

I’ll start by asking you a question: Would you tell your boss you were going to take a day off work due to a mental health problem?

Sick days should be used equally for both mental and physical health, however recent data shows that isn’t the case. In the UK last year, workers took 137 million sick days, with 15.8 million of these being for a mental health problem. To put this into perspective, 34 million sick days were taken for coughs and colds1. One in five people are estimated to be suffering with mental illness at any one time, so why don’t the figures reflect this?

Of course one of the reasons the figure for mental illnesses looks comparatively low could be because they are under-reported – some people may prefer to call in and say they have the flu if they are worried about prejudices at work. People may also be reluctant to take a day off at all if they are struggling with an illness like anxiety, feeling instead like they should be able to carry on. If you had hurt your back and couldn’t move, most people would view this as a legitimate reason to take some time off. But what if you’re struggling to get out of bed due to depression?


world mental health day


There are several reasons why it makes sense for us to be more open about our mental health at work, without it affecting our rights or how we are treated. The recent positive response of a director when one of his workers took some days off for her mental health shows how actually having the conversation around this topic at work can break down some of the perceived stigma around it. Hopefully the publicity surrounding cases such as these will encourage others to take time off to deal with their mental health when they feel as though they need a break.

As well as the obvious advantages of creating a supportive working environment there are also economic benefits of improved mental health in the workplace. It has been estimated that 91 million work days are lost each year due to mental health problems, with a total cost to employers of £26 billion – or £1035 for every worker in the UK2. This isn’t just due to sick days, but staff turnover and reduced productivity too. When people are happier and healthier their performance will improve – these figures show it pays for companies to care about their employees mental health.

If you’re struggling with your mental health at work, or work as a manager and want to make your workplace a more supportive environment then Mind have some great resources – find them here. 



  1. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40593256
  2. https://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/employment-the-economic-case

Thoughts on starting a PhD…

As of last week, I am no longer a full-time employed person. Instead, I’ll be continuing working two days a week as a Research Associate, whilst being a full time PhD student! This isn’t really something which I was expecting to happen this year, as it was never in my career plan to do a PhD. The clinical doctorate to become a Clinical Psychologist always seemed more attractive, possibly because it seemed to flow quite nicely into a career I knew I’d find interesting, and you got paid whilst you were doing it. However, once I realised the tiny number of training places available compared to the number of applicants (probably because of the same reasons I wanted to do it!), I knew I needed to look at other plans.

This was where my job came in. I love what I do, working as a researcher on the Milestone Project – an international research study aiming to improve care for young people approaching the boundary of children and adolescent mental health services. There was an opportunity to do a PhD on the project, but no funding. I was encouraged to apply, and apply to a scholarship on the off chance (it was really competitive but no harm in trying) in case I was successful. A month or so later I found out I’d been offered a place – which led to another anxious 6 week wait until I discovered I had been lucky enough to be offered the scholarship!

Fast forward 6 months, and I’m looking forward to beginning the next stage in my career. It does feel quite daunting, about to being a project which I know will be extremely hard work, and last for the next 3 years (at least) but I’m excited to get started.

Is anyone else about to being a PhD? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments!

image credit: evocellnet.com




Orthorexia – a new type of eating disorder?

You might have heard some of the negativity in the press recently about so called ‘clean eating’ and it’s advocates, who promote a lifestyle which involves cutting out any processed food and often entire food groups (gluten/dairy etc). This is not because of any medical reason, but simply just to be as ‘healthy’ as possible. I’m not going to go anymore into the debate around clean eating today (there’s too much to say, and several people have done it already) but I’ve mentioned it here as it has been linked to a rise in a condition known as orthorexia.

Orthorexia nervosa (so called by Steven Bratman, 1996) is characterised by a fixation with healthy food consumption. More than just dieting, sufferers will become obsessed with healthy food, and food will become preoccupying and a source of anxiety. Other problems often caused by this disorder include social isolation due to having to have complete control over their food intake, and some nutrient deficiencies caused by an extremely limited diet.

image from http://www.thefullhelping.com/neda-week-2014-considering-orthorexia

People with orthorexia (like some who ‘eat clean’) will often cut whole food groups or types of food out of their diet, thinking this will benefit their health. Common foods to be avoided are those which include artificial colours, flavours or preservatives, or foods perceived as containing too much sugar, or salt (Catalina et al., 2005). Orthorexics will also develop strict rules about food, which may also extend to rituals around food preparation (Chaki et al, 2013).

However, despite it’s increasing recognition, orthorexia isn’t listed as an official disorder by the DSM-V diagnostic manual for mental illness. As it is a relatively new disorder, research on orthorexia is lacking compared to other eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia. There is some debate about whether orthorexia is a subtype of one of these existing eating disorders (Zamora et al, 2005), an eating disorder in it’s own right (Bratman & Knight, 2000), or a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder (e.g. Mathieu, 2005). Alternatively, some researchers view it as a combination of the above e.g. Brytek-Matera (2012) who describes orthorexia as “a disturbed eating habit which is connected with obsessive-compulsive symptoms.”

As researchers are still unclear how to categorise orthorexia, it is unsurprising it hasn’t yet made it in the DSM-V. However, despite it’s absence, Bratman & Knight (2000) have developed some guidelines for diagnosing orthorexia. These include:

  • preparing healthy food overtaking other activities in life, with sufferers spending over 3 hours a day thinking about or preparing food
  • following a very strict and restrictive diet plan
  • a healthy diet becoming linked to self-esteem, and feelings over superiority over others who do not follow such a strict regime
  • the nutritional value of a meal becoming more important than it’s taste or the joy from eating it

Orthorexia can be treated successfully, with a combination of cognitive behaviour therapy and medication such as SSRIs (a type of antidepressant) being shown to be effective in some cases (Mathieu, 2005). This study also suggested that orthorexics responded better to treatment than suffers of other eating disorders, perhaps due to their concerns and increased awareness about their health.

There is no question that more research needs to be done to establish more data on people living with this condition, which will enable preventative measures and effective treatments to be developed.


The Power of Conversation


It’s a well known fact that a problem shared is a problem halved, right? But when you’re feeling down or worried sometimes talking about your feelings can seem too hard. For some people it could be easier to bury these feelings and try and carry on regardless, or for others admitting how they truly felt would seem a sign of weakness.

As you may know it’s Mental Health Awareness week in the UK, so this year I’ve decided to write about the power of conversation, and why you don’t have to deal with everything on your own.

Talking to others about their feelings is something men can be particularly bad at, especially when it comes to any concerns about their physical or mental health. To quote the columnist and campaigner Bryony Gordon in her recent article “Women are encouraged to talk about their problems. Men just have football.” Prince Harry was recently praised for his honesty in talking about his mental health – something which will hopefully change the stereotypical view that British men should have a ‘stiff upper lip’ and not show any sign of emotion.

This gender divide has led to inequality in mental health. In 2016, 3 times more men committed suicide than women. Suicide takes more lives of men under the age of 45 than accidents or disease.

Why is it that men are more at risk of suicide than women, when more women are diagnosed with a common mental illness? One explanation is that men aren’t as good at accessing healthcare as women – for example in the first 3 quarters of 2015, only 36% of those who accessed Improving Access to Psychological Therapy (IAPT) services were male*. Men are also less willing to let others know if they have a problem, with one survey finding that only a quarter of men said they had disclosed a mental health problem to a friend within a month, compared to a third of women. Almost 30% of men said they never tried to access help for their last mental health problem, compared to just under 20% of women **.

Accessing the correct care early is vital in the successful treatment of mental illness. For most common mental illnesses, talking therapies are used as a form of treatment (possibly in conjunction with medication). These include Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Psychotherapy, Dialectic Behaviour Therapy, or Counselling – just to name a few. Having the opportunity to talk about thoughts and behaviours with a trained professional can give you the space to work out the cause of your worry or identify any patterns in your thinking which contribute to negative feelings. Therapies such as CBT also try to change behaviours using set goals agreed between the patient and professional which can lead to an improvement in mental wellbeing.

This evidence shows that the culture has to change. Why should it be taboo for men to speak about their feelings in the pub with their mates, as I do with my girlfriends over dinner? Anyone should feel like they have someone to talk to about their problems, even if that person is a healthcare professional – they’re there to help.

On a final note – one project I’m proud to be involved in which is aiming to reduce the stigma of mental illness is a zine called ‘do what you want’. This includes articles from a range of writers and has been featured in the Guardian, BBC and Grazia. All proceeds go to mental health charities, and the ebook (and print version whilst it’s still in stock!) can be ordered here: http://dowhatyouwantzine.co.uk

* https://www.menshealthforum.org.uk/key-data-mental-health


Exercise and Mental Health

This blog post was inspired by the recent London Marathon, who’s official charity was Head’s Together (a charity set up by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, which aims to reduce the stigma of mental illness) making it the first mental health marathon.

As well as raising millions of pounds for charities which work to improve our mental health, the physical act of training for and running the marathon can also provide a boost to our mental health.

That high you get after going for a run, dancing with your friends or a hard gym session? It’s caused by an increase in endorphins, a neurotransmitter released by the pituitary gland which have been shown to act as a painkiller, and improve your mood.


Exercise has been found to have benefits for people suffering from different types of mental illness, from depression (Balchin et al, 2016), bipolar disorder (Ng et al, 2007) and schizophrenia (Gorczynski & Faulkner, 2010). Other studies have suggested that exercise could also help protect people from neurodegenerative conditions which can affect us as we get older, such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, as well as improving symptoms and quality of life for people with these conditions (Deslandes et al, 2009). This could be because exercise stimulates blood flow in the brain as well as improving overall fitness. Increased levels of exercise in older adults has been linked to have several positive outcomes, including improved mental health and social integration (Chodzko-Zajko et al, 2009).

Exercise can also help to improve mood in sedentary (but otherwise healthy) participants. One study in Turkey (Taspinar et al, 2014) compared participants who took part in either a Hatha yoga or a Resistance workout program where they trained for an average of 50 minutes, 3 times a week for 7 weeks, to participants who did no extra exercise. The researchers found that participants in the exercise groups showed improved quality of life, body image, self-esteem and lower symptoms of depression after taking part. Participants in the control group showed no change. Yoga was better for improving symptoms of tiredness and depression, and self-esteem, whilst resistance training led to higher improvements in body image perception. This study also shows that it doesn’t matter what type of exercise you do to get the benefits – although it probably helps to find one you enjoy as it means you’re more likely to continue. In case you’re still not convinced, this graphic summarises the 5 main ways exercise can improve your mood:


However it is important to note that if you are suffering from a mental illness, exercise on its own may not be enough. For some people, it may be hard enough to get out of bed in the morning, to them going for a run would be completely unrealistic. This is why exercise can be so effective in conjunction with other therapies, be it medication or talking therapies like CBT. Once symptoms have started to improve, then incorporating exercise could be a good way to manage your mood.

So next time you’re feeling worried about an exam, stressed about a deadline or feeling lacking in motivation why not try going for a walk or a dance class? You might get hooked on a new hobby which can do much more than just improve your fitness.