Phobias

Hi everyone, this week’s post will be the first of two – all about phobias. This first post will cover causes and types of phobias, and the next on will talk more about treatments. And, as no post about phobias is complete without a quick phobia quiz – what do you think these phobias are? (scroll down for answers!)

  1. Agrizoophobia
  2. Suriphobia
  3. Enetophobia
  4. Coulrophobia
  5. Phasmophobia

 

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by BromeliaCarnivor

Answers:

  1. Fear of wild animals
  2. Fear of mice
  3. Fear of pins
  4. Fear of clowns
  5. Fear of ghosts

 

Although some of these phobias are unusual, some are more common than others – with Arachnophobia (fear of spiders) probably being one of the most well known. However, there is an important distinction between people who simply don’t like spiders, and would prefer not to be in the same room as them, or not want to touch them, and people who are  afraid of spiders i.e. have Arachnophobia. Sufferers of this phobia will experience extreme anxiety and panic if they come into contact with a spider, or even just look at a picture of one. This is a much more severe reaction.

According to the mental health charity Mind, there can be different reasons for a phobia to develop, from learned experiences to genetics. However, although it is true that some people develop phobias after a bad experience e.g. developing a fear of driving after a car crash, this does not occur for everyone with a phobia. Phobias can also be learnt, from observing other people’s reactions, for example if when you were young your older sibling always screamed and ran away from wasps, you might learn to do the same and develop a phobia of them, even if you’ve never been stung.

One famous (and very unethical) experiment on whether a baby could be given a specific phobia was carried out in the 1920’s by Watson & Raynor. The infant – ‘Little Albert’ had no fears or phobias at the start of the experiment, and the researchers wanted to investigate whether he could be given a phobia of white rats. As this picture shows, before the experiment started, he wasn’t frightened.

albert-rat

This study used principles of classical conditioning to give him a phobia – every time he was given a white rat, a loud noise was made by striking a metal bar with a hammer. Understandably, this noise scared him and made him cry. After this happened several times, he began to become upset when he was presented with the rat alone – the rat had become the conditioned stimulus (to read more about classical conditioning, see my blog post here). They also found that his phobia become generalised to other things that were white an furry, such as a white rabbit or when the experimenter wore a big white beard! No one is really sure what happened to Albert after this experiment, and whether his phobia continued into the rest of his life. It’s safe to say however that experiments like this one would not be allowed to take place now.

Thanks for reading and don’t forget to check back next week for Phobias Part 2.

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CBT: what is it and how does it work?

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy,  or CBT is one of the most well known types of psychological therapy.. But how does it work, and why is it so effective?

CBT was developed from the 1950’s, and came to prominence in the 1980’s. It was based on form of Behavioural Therapy, usually used to treat people with phobias. This was based on the principles of classical conditioning: that a conditioned stimulus, when paired with an unconditioned stimulus, produces a conditioned response. This is illustrated by the classic Pavlov’s dogs experiment, as shown below:

CS-US

This process was used a basis for techniques to reduce fear, for example through systematic desentisation – gradually exposing patients to the phobic stimulus in a hierarchy system in order to reduce their fear (e.g. bottom layer of hierarchy: looking at picture of a spider – top layer: holding a spider in your hand). Part of this therapy is to teach the patient to relax during each step, as that prevents anxiety.

CBT builds on the exposure used in behavioural therapy in order to also address the cognitions behind the fear or anxiety. For example, in panic disorder,  patients suffer from recurrent panic attacks which cause intense fear and distress. The cognitive theory of panic disorder (Clark & Wells, 1995) states that panic attacks are brought on by a misinterpretation of physiological symptoms of anxiety such as palpitations or dizziness. The individual interprets these as that they will immediately suffer a physical or mental disaster e.g. a heart attack.

Part of the CBT for patients with panic disorder is exposure – they will go into a crowded place (if this causes panic attacks for them) and record their feelings, in order to discuss with their therapist. However, it has been found that exposure alone is not as effective as if the cognitions which maintain the disorder are not addressed. These are known as safety behaviours (Salkovskis, 1988): for example if a person who has anxiety about crowds and thinks they are going to faint if they are in a crowded place, they might sit down so they don’t faint. The sitting down is the safety behaviour – it prevents people from realising they wouldn’t have fainted from being in a crowd, they think they only reason they didn’t faint was because they took that action. If exposure is paired with strategies to reduce safety behaviours, it is much more effective at reducing panic and anxiety (Salkovskis et al, 1999).

CBT is recommended as the treatment of choice by NICE (the public body which develops treatment guidance for the NHS) for depression and all anxiety disorders – not just panic disorder. In order for it to be effective, Clark et al, 1994 have shown that a ‘cognitive shift’ must occur in patients (a change in their beliefs), or risk of relapse is much higher.

 

Let me know if you’ve got any questions or would like more posts like this – hope you found it interesting!